Why Delaying FIP Treatment is Fatal

Updated: Jan 20


In our effort to save cats from Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) related death, we have met with both successes and failures.  We want to share our experience with those of you who are seeking answers, so that you will make better decisions regarding your cat's FIP treatment.

The most important factors influencing the success rate of FIP treatment is how early FIP is diagnosed and treated.

In the Dry form, FIP in cat is particularly difficult to diagnose. The virus attacks internal organs and leave few visible external signs that point cleared to the relatively rare FIP infection (less than 1% of cats around the world get FIP). Only when the virus has entered the eyes, making them cloudy or entered the brain causing physical paralysis does it becomes clear that Dry FIP is the cause. By then there is little time left for treatment.  From our past observations, cats that did recover from late stage FIP infections were usually young in age and strong in overall physical condition. If you are reading this article and suspecting that your cats may be exhibiting Dry FIP symptoms, call your veterinarian immediately and schedule a blood test.


Read about the 4 FIP testing methods here.

FIP viral infection diagnosis are often not conclusive. We have heard stories from cat owners that after visiting two doctors with their cat and reviewing blood test reports, one doctor confidently claimed it was a FIP, while the other doctor didn’t think so.  When in doubt, they messaged us seeking advice on what to do.  


In situations when there are conflicting diagnosis, and because delaying FIP treatment often lead to preventable death, we recommended giving your cat GS-441524 treatment for 1-2 weeks. If it is FIP, you will quickly see an improvement in your cat's condition.  GS-441524 is an antiviral treatment that does not cause any known complications and can be administered along with other drugs.  Cats infected with FIP, when